reading

Reflections on the Past Year

While the beginning of January may seem to be a more appropriate time of year for reflecting on the past year, performance review time in the office tends to be mid-February. Despite some challenges, I think this year was quite successful, both in the workplace and outside work. During August, I presented a paper on Paddy Forde's novella "On Spirit" and Rob Sawyer's short story "Just Like Old Times" at the Social Science on the Final Frontier academic conference at Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario. It was a nice little conference, and it was nice to see Rob Sawyer and Julie E. Czerneda at the conference. This was my second academic paper presented at a conference, and was a lot of fun.

During the year, I didn't accomplish much fiction writing, something which I'm planning to remedy. Part of my problem in the past year is that I haven't made the time to write. I've proven to myself that I can now write 250-500 words a day for blog posts, in addition to my coursework assignments. I'm going to see if I can add fiction writing to these word counts in the next few weeks. If it doesn't seem to be working, I may decide to reduce the size or frequency of my blog posts. It's something that I've been struggling with.

I've done some nice improvements around the home this past year. I'm particularly happy with my garage, now that it's been organized. Previously, neither car would fit inside. Now, both can fit inside, as well as my snowblower. Yes, this is a first world problem, and I'm aware that I'm contributing to urban sprawl, etc. It's a beautiful property, with a very large backyard for spending time with the family, but city transit doesn't come anywhere near here. The way things stand, I'm just not willing to consider alternative ways to get to work.

Book Review: Dreadnought by Cherie Priest

Cherie Priest's novel Boneshaker was released in 2009, and was an instant hit for it's dramatic engagement with many of the steampunk tropes. It was named Steampunk Book of the Year by Steampunk.com  The cover of the book was self-consciously taking on the standard elements of steampunk: brass goggles, airships. The novel introduced us to Cherie Priest's alternate history: The Clockwork Century, where the American civil war raged on for decades, and zombies roam the streets of Seattle. The book was fun, but there were some valid criticisms about the branching narratives. The storyline of Briar Wilkes was considerably stronger than that of her son, Zeke. In the sequel novel, Dreadnought, Priest uses a more traditional single-path narrative, and uses a strong female protagonist again. It's a very liminal text, with many borders and boundaries being crossed. In the tale, nurse Mercy Lynch must travel from Virginia across the continent by airship, and steam locomotive to the west coast. Along the way, Union and Confederate soldiers and sympathizers interact with Texans, and Mexicans. As the main action of the novel takes place upon the Union locomotive Dreadnought, the tension increases steadily as they approach the mountain passages through the Rockies. It's really effective plotting, as there are really no options for escaping from the oncoming battle. In these tight quarters, Priest still manages to weave together several interesting subplots, which link together with some introduced in Boneshaker.

While reading the novel, I quickly came to a point where I couldn't put the book down. At an even 400 pages in length, that's no mean feat. While Dreadnought may not have quite the same level of appeal as Boneshaker, especially for more youthful audiences, as Mercy Lynch is older than young Zeke Wilkes was, I think Dreadnought is ultimately a more finely crafted novel. The books can be read in either order, and while they do tie together, they are largely independent stories. I'm looking forward to reading more of Cherie Priest's novels. While Boneshaker and Dreadnought are published by Tor, Priest has also written Clementine in this alternate history, which is published by Subterranean Press. Unfortunately, the Kindle ebook isn't available in Canada, and the Subterranean Press book appears to be out of print.

Weekend Reading and Gardening

I haven't had nearly as much time to read as I would like to this weekend. I finally finished up the last chapter of Harperland, so I could return it to the library. Again, if you're interested in politics, you really should give it a shot. I've primarily been focusing on my course readings. I've been giving chapter 7 "Phaeacia's Halls and Gardens" in The Odyssey a close reading, in particular the hospitality scene as Odysseus becomes a guest of the mythic Phaeacians. There's a lot going on in this scene, but I won't be posting it right now, as I plan to write an essay on this chapter. I'm continually amazed by how layered this book is, and in particular the non-linear plot progression.

I've also been reading more of Batty and Cain's Media Writing, particularly the chapter on magazine writing. It's brought to mind some of the techniques used in some of the magazines I've picked up recently. Magazines have a much longer lead time than newspaper writing, which is certainly exhibited in Volume 22 number 1. Anuual 2011 issue of Canadian Gardening. The article "Seasons of Love" written by Yvonne Cunnington clearly shows the long term nature of some of these articles. The author of this article shows how landscapes and gardens can be planted in order to best suit the varying seasons. Along with the text, photographs (taken by Donna Griffith) show several locations through the four seasons, so the choice of plants can be seen through the seasons, providing interest year round. It's an effective article, especially for publication during the winter months. As I look to my snowy backyard, then back to the pages of the magazine, I can't help but draw some bleak conclusions. These gardeners spend a lot more time and effort on their gardens than I do.